All posts by Sue Wheat

Job: Food Rescue and Community Meals Coordinator

Deadline extended: Midnight Mon 7 October.

Do you have time and skills that can help us make a difference in the lives of people and the environment? 

At The Hornbeam Centre we have been educating and helping people for the past 25 years to make an active contribution in low cost living and low impact on the environment. The Hornbeam has a growing team of staff, sessional workers, volunteers and partners all working collaboratively to develop and facilitate community led solutions to local issues. 

We have a role for a Food Rescue & Community Meals Coordinator. We are looking for a person who is passionate about food connections, with the ability to reach out and motivate others to get active and involved in the community, reducing the footprint on the environment and getting communities together. 

This project resides under our Low Cost Living initiative, which seeks to facilitate and engage people in activities that support reducing financial, health and environmental costs. 

The role is a 3 day per week commitment £12.50 per hour, 21 hours per week for 18 months starting October 2019. 

Role Description 

The Food Rescue & Community Meals Co-ordinator’s role will be to facilitate and coordinate The Hornbeam Food Rescue Project, including welcome meals for new arrivals, developing a model that can be replicated to meet the needs of other communities in Waltham Forest. Our Food Rescue Project is an innovative initiative collecting, processing and distributing surplus food to prevent waste and food poverty. The Welcome Meals project aims to integrate new arrivals into the borough through a programme of community meals. 

Core Tasks: 

Coordination 

• Coordinate and support all activities related to the Food Rescue Project and community meals 

• Plan, support and coordinate free community meals for new arrivals making use of existing and new offers 

• Support ‘Welcome Meals’ project deliverers to meet proposed funding outputs 

• Coordinate offers of volunteering and activities being available to ‘Welcome Meal’ participants 

• Map existing food offers/community meals in the borough aimed to tackle food poverty 

• Map venues and community kitchens for potential new community meal initiatives 

• Acquire, utilise and organise storage solutions for the food received 

Outreach/Engagement 

• Establish potential entry/contact points for new arrivals 

• Develop network of partnerships and organisations to collaborate and engage participants 

• Work in targeted geographical communities and reach out to engage local people in various forms of social action to develop solutions to local food poverty and social isolation issues 

Development 

• Build a network of surplus food suppliers in E17 and E4 

• Develop a network of food surplus beneficiaries including: existing community groups, organisations, and individuals 

• Develop new partnerships 

• Develop logistics plan in participation with volunteers, staff and stakeholders 

• Develop strategies and funding for new related projects 

Communication 

• Responsible for all communication regarding the projects on various social media and other media platforms, including WF Council website 

Monitor, Evaluation & Feedback 

• Liaise with project partners to deliver outcomes in line with funding agreements 

• Keep record of all partners and individuals for feed back and evaluation purposes in compliance with GDPR 

• Coordinate data capture with various groups involved and prepare weekly feedback reports 

• Prepare monthly feedback report on progress with a final report at end of each funded project 

• Capture and save evaluation data/evidence including case studies, to demonstrate targets are being met 

Other 

• Manage project budgets and follow financial procedures set out 

• Make things happen in line with The Hornbeam values (set out below). 

• Managing relationships between various partners that make up the Hornbeam group, and partners with whom we deliver projects 

Person Specification 

1. Experience of delivering projects, evaluating and making reports to funders

2. Experience of recruiting and supporting volunteers within a community setting.

3. Strong leadership skills, with an ability to involve, motivate and support paid staff, volunteers and beneficiaries.

4. Excellent organisational skills and project management

5. An ability to work and communicate well with a wide variety of people

6. An innovative and flexible approach to work

7. An ability to work under own supervision, to manage and prioritise own workload and to meet deadlines, but also to work as part of a team

8. An understanding of working in a small community organisation where responsiblility for the overall running of the organisation is shared collectively among staff and directors.

9. A supportive and empowering approach to working alongside staff, workers, volunteers, partners and partner projects

10. Ability to manage and nurture relationships with a range of different partners; from small volunteer-led groups to council departments

11. Experience of, and ability to work within a small community-based organisation

12. Some fundraising experience

13. A commitment to Hornbeam’s values and an enthusiasm to drive social change 

Salary: £22,750 pro-rata (£13,650 per annum) 

Mainly Based at: Hornbeam, 458 Hoe Street, London E17 9AH 

Working Hours: 21 hours per week, flexible (with a possibility to increase to 24.5 hours) 

Annual Leave: 28 days per year (pro-rata) 

Contract: Fixed term one year contract in the first instance. There is a probationary period of three months. 

Equal Opportunities: Hornbeam serves a multi-racial community and welcomes applications from women, black and ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, and LGBTQ+ individuals so as to build up a representative workforce. 

The Hornbeam Centre: Vision, Mission and Values 

The Hornbeam: a community organisation working with a range of partners in Waltham Forest and beyond.

We offer: 

SPACE for communities to meet in E17 and E4, TIME and support to develop community initiatives, 

SKILLS and knowledge about low cost, low impact living. 

Our Vision is of active communities where people have a positive impact on their environment. 

Our Mission is to 

● Inspire people to think about how we live our lives and use resources 

● Empower community-led action and support new initiatives that lead to positive environ- mental and social change 

Our values are what drive us and inform our way of working: 

● We are inclusive and people-focused: we believe people of all backgrounds and abilities have a role in achieving a just future for all of us and our environment, and we engage with the concerns and passions of individuals & community groups. 

● We are creative and collaborative: we believe that innovation will help us to achieve the change we want to see, and that by working alongside partners and local community groups we will make that change lasting. 

● We are committed to the careful use of resources, both environmental and human. 

● We are committed to being transparent in our governance and in how we communicate with partners and supporters 

● We are committed to remaining relevant to our community and conscious of the priorities of the people we work with 

Deadline: Mon 7 Oct midnight.
Please email a CV and covering letter replying to the person spec above to admin@hornbeam.org.uk
Interviews will be held week of  14-19 October.
We regret we will not be able to reply to all applicants only those who are shortlisted.

We are an equal opportunities employer and if you require any specific support with the application please get in touch.

People’s Kitchen – every Monday

People's Kitchen menu
People’s Kitchen menu

Every Monday the normal Hornbeam Cafe is closed, but we transform it with volunteer-led cooking, using zero waste food donated from supermarkets and local shops as part of our Food Rescue Project.

Food is served 1pm, or come and help make the lunch and join us at 10am to prep the food.

Everyone welcome so come and share lunch with others who live and work locally. Do tell your neighbour or colleagues.

EDIT: We are now also providing zero-waste Pay-What-You-Feel food in the cafe on Tuesday and Wednesdays too.

People's Kitchen volunteers preparing food
People’s Kitchen volunteers preparing food

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People’s Kitchen is part of Hornbeam’s Food for London project, which works with Waltham Forest Food Rescue and other anti-food waste organisations.

Visit our Best Before pop-up ‘pay-what-you-feel’ food stall outside the Hornbeam every Monday too (weather permitting). New volunteers always welcome.

Contact volunteering@hornbeam.org.uk to help on stalls or to collect food for local agencies supporting those in need. 

Tues-Wed Pay-What-You-Feel Community Cafe

Every Tuesday and Wednesday we are running a warm and friendly Pay-What-You-Feel community cafe with a focus on organic and surplus food. 10-4pm

We make tasty, homely breakfast and lunch and all of our ingredients are either surplus or organic. Many are both.

We don’t have prices. Instead, we run on a pay-what-you-feel basis. That means you choose how much you pay for your time in the cafe based on how you feel — and it’s up to you to decide what that means! (But we’re also very happy to chat with you about it.)

Using surplus is what allows us to keep our costs down so that we can run in the way that we do. Just as importantly, it minimises our environmental impact, reducing good food going to waste and getting it where it should be: on people’s plates.

Landfilled food and overproduction are major producers of greenhouse gases. We are in the midst of a climate and ecological emergency and our food system needs a radical shake-up to become truly sustainable for both people and planet. We believe in a slower pace of life that chooses low-cost, low-impact living and a deeper connection with the rest of nature.
Community Cafe sign

Our aim is to create an inclusive cafe space for all to enjoy, regardless or their experiences, circumstances, or background. It is not about charity, but about providing a communal and warm space where anyone can spend and share their time over simple, nutritious, plant-based food that is healthy and sustainable. We believe that this can help to build a more connected, resilient, and sustainable community.

We are not-for-profit, but we don’t rely on grants, so need to stay afloat on our own terms. We rely on some customers paying more while others pay less. It is important for us that everyone feels able to return regularly, which means paying what feels affordable to you.

We are linked to the Hornbeam’s Food Rescue Project, and it is through this route that we get much of our surplus ingredients. Most of our organic produce comes from our friends at Organiclea, sold as surplus after returning from market. A few other essential ingredients are bought from workers’ cooperative wholesalers, such as Suma, as well as a handful of local stores.

We are lucky that we can support more sustainable farming practices by using organic ingredients while also keeping our costs low. Organic food is generally more expensive than otherwise equivalent produce for fair reasons — it is more costly to produce — but it is nonetheless clear that this can create an accessibility issue that needs some thoughtful improvement.

We run cooperatively, meaning that we reach a consensus as a group on how to use any small profits we do make, in line with our values and principles outlined above. We are always looking for enthusiastic people to join or collaborate with us, so please contact if you’re interested.

Following on from the success of our Food Rescue Kitchen on Mondays, we are stopping good food from going to landfill and cooking it up into delicious food to be enjoyed by you on Tuesday and Wednesdays too!

Do join us from 10-4pm for breakfast, lunch, drinks and scrumptious cakes – all vegan of course.

Thurs-Sun we continue to host the amazing What the Fattoush? serving Palestinian vegan meals, including supper time.

Cafe hours.

What the Fattoush? Current Test Kitchen

We are delighted to have What the Fattoush? are our current Test Kitchen  (What is a Test Kitchen?)

What the Fattoush? are serving plant-based, Palestinian plates alongside coffee, cakes and pastries at The Hornbeam this spring and summer.

What the Fattoush? is a plant-based, Palestinian street food company founded by best friends Jess and Meg. They were taught to cook Middle Eastern food whilst volunteering at refugee camps across Europe and Palestine. Gluten free options available.

What the Fattoush? donate 10% of their profits to SkatePal – an NGO supporting young people in Palestine through skateboarding.

They will be running the cafe from Thurs-Sun during the day and  Palestinian Nights Supper Clubs. 

Drop-in no need to book.

Follow What the Fattoush? on Instagram.

Contact/booking info:

Jess Howe: jess@whatthefattoush.com

Contact/booking info:

What the Fattoush? Plant-based, Palestinian street food company
What the Fattoush? Plant-based, Palestinian street food company

What the Fattoush? Palestinian Night menus

PALESTINIAN NIGHTS Plant-based, Palestinian Plates

STARTERS

Fatteh £6 / £8.5 The Middle East’s answer to nachos – pitta chips loaded with South Levantine stew, Gazan guac (avo, harissalabneh,sumac and sesame seeds), pickled chillies and pomegranate seeds *£1 from every fatteh ordered goes directly to @Skate_Pal

Trio of dips £8.5 (gf option) Baba Ghanoush (smoked aubergine & tahini), Mahammara (red pepper, walnut & pomegranate molasses) & Hummus with Arabic bread.

MAZZEH All dishes come with bread & pickles

Kibbeh £6.5 Potato and bulgur wheat shells filled with spiced ‘mince’ Falafel & Hummus £4.5 (gf) Made the Palestinian way, heavy on the herbs! Mini Maqlubeh £5.5 Layered vegetables and spiced arborio rice, finished with toasted almonds. Literally translated as ‘upside down’, Makloubeh is one of Palestine’s favourite dishes. Dolma £5 Grape leaves stuffed with spiced ‘mince’, rice, nuts and herbs Tabbouleh £4.5 Zesty tomatoes, cucumbers, red onion, bulgur wheat and plenty of herbs

South Levantine stew £5.5 (gf) Slow-cooked aubergines, peppers and chickpeas in a rich and silky tomato sauce Bamiya – Tempura okra with a date & tam £6 Deep-fried okra in aspiced,lightlywhippedbatterservedwitha tangy date and tamarind sauce Za’atar potatoes £4.5 (gf) Crispy potatoes dusted in Palestine’s famous spice mix za’atar (dried thyme, oregano marjoram and toasted sesame seeds) Freekeh, aubergine & ‘feta’ salad £6 Smokey, young, cracked wheat with roasted aubergine, mixed leaves, coconut-based ‘feta’ and finished with pomegranate seeds and toasted pine nuts Mshaat m’a dagga £6 Cauliflower fritters with a spicy tomato sauce

Tag us in your pictures! @whatthefattoush

PALESTINIAN NIGHTS Plant-based, Palestinian Plates

EXTRAS

Za’atar Arabic bread £3 Warm, pillowy Arabic bread dusted in Palestine’s famous spice mix za’atar (dried thyme, oregano marjoram and toasted sesame seeds)

Labneh £2 Cashew-based thick yoghurt Zhoug £2 Spicy green chilli, coriander and cardamom sauce

SWEETS

Kanafeh £6 Palestine’s most iconic dessert from the West Bank city of Nablus. Soft cashew ‘cheese’ soaked in sweet, orange blossom syrup and topped with crispy vermicelli noodles and pistachios.

Awameh £5 Sweet dumplings dripping in cinnamon spiked agave nectar

*What the Fattoush? work in partnership with @Skate_Pal, supporting young people in Palestine through skateboarding

Tag us in your pictures! @whatthefattoush 

DRINKS

Alcoholic

Five points brewery Pils Pale ale Porter

Cocktails Cardamom espresso martini Watermelon slushy Pomegranate punch

wine Red wine glass/bottle White wine glass /bottle

wine Red wine glass/bottle White wine glass /bottle

Hot Drinks

Espresso Macchiato Cortado Americano Long black

Fresh mint tea English breakfast tea Earl grey Herbal tea (please ask about type****) Hot chocolate

Latte cappuccino Flat white Cardamon long black Orange blossom latte

Latte cappuccino Flat white Cardamon long black Orange blossom latte

Soft drinks

Grapefruit Pomegranate and elderflower

Kiwi lime and mint Sparkling water

Tag us in your pictures! @whatthefattoush 

A remarkable journey – 25 years

This weekend (20 April 2019) the Hornbeam’s founder members gathered to celebrate the Centre’s 25th birthday milestone. They shared stories with us of this remarkable journey.

The Hornbeam started with a dream in the hearts of two people – Jowanna Lewis and Diane Sizer in 1994. With around 100 volunteers  and much dedication, commitment and endurance the Hornbeam came to life.

The vision then was creating a community hub in Walthamstow, providing food, meeting space facilities, and resources to educate and empower people on sustainable living.

Jowanna Lewis gave an inspiring speech, remembering the hard work and commitment put in by so many volunteers: “Over three and a half years more than 100 people came and worked her giving up days, evenings and weekends of their life. Virtually everyone thought it was amazing. On the opening day I so wanted to stay in bed I was so exhausted – this place is the result of real sweat and tears, but it was worth it!”

Jowanna and others explained how they asked Waltham Forest Council for permission to refurbish the derelict building and they received amazing support for the project throughout from councillors, happy to see a derelict building be put to use.

Anne Redlinghuys, Hornbeam’s Coordinator, said “It is just so awesome to be in your presence. What you’ve accomplished is amazing. When I read through the articles about the beginnings of the Hornbeam and your vision I am so pleased to see that we’re still on the same page. We are still a safe space in the community, we are still and environmental centre running educational projects. You created an amazing community space and should be so proud.”

Despite some very tricky times in the Hornbeam’s 25 years, especially as funding has become harder to access due to austerity, Hornbeam Director, Brian Kelly pointed out that working with Forest Recycling Project, Organiclea and HEET on a ‘low cost living’ project has meant that the Hornbeam has been able to take the lead as a ‘community anchor’ – “our vision is to keep facilitating others to do amazing things, and also to have our own Hornbeam projects going on, like the Food Rescue Project.”

Today 25 years later The Hornbeam Centre also runs the Hornbeam Learning Lodge in Chingford and has the same vision as 25 years ago.

Thanks to everyone that has contributed and is still doing so to make the world a better place. Viva for the next 25 years!

more stories and videos to come….

The Story of building The Hornbeam

This article first appeared as a magazine article in Stories from the Grassroots in 1994.

Cover for article 'So Long, and Thanks For All The Dust.'
Cover for article ‘So Long, and Thanks For All The Dust.’

So long… and thanks for all the dust.

That was the title penned by a friend and co-volunteer for his novel about our experiences building The Hornbeam.

We’d spent an entire Sunday chipping loose plaster off the walls and doubted we’d ever be free of the dust. And as for the thought that one day people would be able to eat in the planned vegetarian café, well it seemed inconceivable. But the novel never got written, since the friend took the easy way out of volunteering at The Hornbeam – he emigrated to the USA.

So what is a Hornbeam? Well it’s a tree that’s very common in our area of North East London. But now it’s also an Environmental Centre, and very proud of it we are too.

So Long and Thanks for All the Dust page 1
So Long and Thanks for All the Dust page 1

I guess my involvement began back in 1990, when I first met Jowanna and Diane at a meeting of the local environmental forum. They’d met while working at a local vegetarian café, which had become the meeting point of a Friends of the Earth group. Unfortunately the café had closed down, but Jowanna and Diane realised the place was more than just a café, it had been an environmental focus for the whole area, and they weren’t going to let that focus disappear just because the place wasn’t open any more. So the idea was born. An urban environmental centre, run by the community for the community. A vegetarian café and restaurant, a retail outlet for fair trade goods, exhibition space for local arts and crafts, meeting rooms, an environmental educational resource, offices for environmental groups, displays of renewable energy systems, the list was endless. But how do two well meaning people turn a dream into reality? Well after four years hard labour we’ve all learnt the hard way how to do it.

Jowanna and Diane told me their ideas and I was sold on it. Basically along with many other people, I wanted there to be just such a place. Those people included the Economic Development Unit of the local authority, a community recycling project, the local environmental forum and a number of individuals. The recycling project made some office space available, the EDU made a feasibility grant available and Jowanna and Diane took it from there. They produced a business plan and on the strength of that got a couple of grants and some low interest loans.

Now all that was needed was some premises. The recycling project occupied part of a council owned building and the rest of it was vacant, and with plenty of imagination Jowanna and Diane saw the environmental centre of their dreams. It needed plenty of imagination though, since the building was virtually derelict, and the £20,000 of money wasn’t going to go very far.

Anyway the lease was signed and the volunteers moved in. Looking back it’s hard to believe how naive we were. We started work in February 1992 and talked about it being open soon after Easter. It makes me blush even thinking about it, but I suppose if we’d realised how long it was going to take then we’d probably never have started.

So the building work commenced.

So Long and Thanks for All the Dust page 3-4
So Long and Thanks for All the Dust page 3-4

Initially we were just demolishing rickety walls and removing plasterwork and flooring. But as time went on we attracted a few professionals and with their guidance our confidence grew. You name it, we did it; built walls, laid bricks, plastered everything (including ourselves), re-wired, re-plumbed, installed central heating, built toilets moved the stairs and had a tremendous amount of fun doing it. At one stage, Jowanna actually considered giving up the environmental centre idea and starting her own building firm, but it didn’t last.

By the summer of 1993 the centre was really starting to take shape, but the money was running out. We’d been continuously fundraising, but the big grant applications hadn’t come off, and although the quiz nights and benefit gigs helped, the money didn’t go very far.

The building was owned by the council, and since we were improving one of their properties, we decided to seek a grant from them. After a few problems trying to explain what we were about to a few councillors, but with the whole-hearted support of other councillors and officers, we received a grant of £8,000 to complete the building work. So we did.

As November drew to a close, the basic work was completed. As planned, the downstairs was ready to open temporarily as a shop, to raise some much needed cash by selling Christmas merchandise. On November 30th we worked till well past midnight, stocking the makeshift shelves and creating a window display. We left for home in the early hours, with great expectations for the morning. These however, were dashed by some uninvited visitors, who must have watched us the night before. At around 6am they forced the fire exit and started helping themselves to our merchandise. Fortunately for us a police officer, who was on his way home from work, spotted them and intervened. The burglars ran off and the police sat in the centre until our shocked volunteers turned up at 9 o’clock.

Although nothing had been stolen, most of our stock had been packed into boxes by the thieves, so the police took it all as evidence. So come our opening time we had nothing to sell. Word soon spread and volunteers started arriving. One went down to the police station, and by 11 o’clock was back, arriving in a police car with all our merchandise. Amazingly, by midday we were open, with all our original stock. The feeling of relief was incredible, and we got plenty of publicity, but it was a trauma we could all have done without.

The shop, which was entirely run by volunteer effort, stayed open till Christmas Eve, and we closed down £1,000 better off.

The next time we opened the centre would be complete, but only if we could raise a further £5,000 to equip the kitchen and restaurant. Without these we would not have the means to be self-financing, and we weren’t prepared to always be dependent on handouts. This is where our supporter scheme saved the day.

Back in November, when we’d realised we needed to raise funds for the kitchen, we came up with the idea of the supporter scheme. Basically we asked local people to loan us £50 (or multiples thereof) for five years. Interest would be paid in discount vouchers for the restaurant, and the money paid back after the five year period. The response was staggering, over £5,000! All we had to do now was build the kitchen, and finish off the rest of the building.

On April 23rd at midday the Mayor, accompanied by two local MPs, cut the ribbon and the centre opened. It was a marvellous day. Everyone involved was on a high, which was a good job, since we worked non-stop for the previous two weeks. And the party that night was a heck of a do.

So The Hornbeam has now been open for six months (December 1994), with Jowanna as Centre Co­ordinator and Diane as head chef, but it’s been far from plain sailing. Initially staff were recruited to run the café and restaurant but business was a bit too slow at first. After three months we hit a cash crisis. Supporters chipped in with a further £2,000, expenditure cuts were made and some staff took pay cuts or even voluntary redundancy. The lost working hours and more besides were made up by volunteers, including the people who’d taken redundancy.

So the centre survived, business has now picked up and we’re about to recruit more staff, though we’re still dependent on volunteer labour at the moment. We also recently won our first regional award, which was a tremendous morale boost.

But what have we achieved? Well, Jowanna and Diane’s dream is a reality. They’re the first to admit that it’s not as they imagined, but I feel we really have created what they set out to achieve; Hornbeam is an urban environmental focus for the area. Groups are meeting at the centre and taking initiatives which would not have happened had Hornbeam not been there. People, previously uninvolved with local environmental issues, are coming into the centre and getting involved. The centre is also providing a means of distributing information and enabling communication.

And how about the individuals, the 90-odd volunteers and everyone else involved, what have we got out of creating our own environmental centre? A tremendous feeling of community between everyone involved. Skills which we never imagined we’d get (and perhaps wouldn’t have wanted five years ago). But what stands out for me, is the realisation that with a lot of vision and a little encouragement, ordinary people can achieve great things.

It’s hard work, but can give you a buzz like little else. It brings you to tears when it goes wrong, but the elation when you succeed makes it all worthwhile. And it produces a hell of a lot of dust.

Jim Craddock (September 1994)

Read more about The Hornbeam’s early days

Come to the 25th Birthday Party – Sat 20 April

Back to Hornbeam’s Home Page

The Hornbeam is 25 years old this year – this is its story

Jim Craddock, one of the founding ‘Hornbeamers’ tells the story of how The Hornbeam came into being.

Twenty five years ago on St Georges Day – at the Bakers Arms end of Hoe Street – something special happened. A group of concerned environmentalists had coalesced around an idea – an Environmental Centre for Waltham Forest – and on 23 April 1994 – they opened the doors to The Hornbeam Centre and Café.

The management committee at The Hornbeam (formerly called Gannets) on Opening Day, 24 April 1994.
The management committee at The Hornbeam (formerly called Gannets) on Opening Day, 23 April 1994.

From left to right it’s David ‘Nod’ Ellis, Jowanna Lewis, Bundy Braga, Diane Sizer, Dave Cullen, George Warren, Lesley Broadbent and Christian Mountney.


There had been a vegetarian café in Palmerston Road, which had provided a focus for locals, but that had closed. Forest Recycling Project (which is still going from strength to strength after nearly 30 years) had just started out, so Jowanna Lewis and Diane Sizer, who’d met at the Palmerston Road café, decided an old newsagents on Hoe Street would be the perfect venue for the new one.

Their vision was amazing and their enthusiasm soon rubbed off on other people.  And so with a small amount of funding, a lot of volunteer time and effort and an incredible amount of dust, Hornbeam Environmental Centre opened on 23rd April 1994.  And it’s still going today, with its vegan café and restaurant (called Gannets) and community space providing that continuing focus for environmental action in the borough.

This Easter Saturday (20th April 2019), some of those idealists are meeting up at Hornbeam to see how their vision has evolve.  Jim Craddock, a local Greenpeace volunteer in the early 1990s is among those coming back to the centre for the first time in almost 20 years.

Jim said: “We didn’t realise what we were getting into back then, but there was something infectious about giving up your weekends to build the place, and then, once it had opened, volunteering at the restaurant once you’d finished your day job.  Seeing it thriving 25 years later has made that investment so worthwhile.”

The Hornbeam Environmental Centre and Café now has many more strings to its bow.  Their Learning Lodge at Pimp Hall Nature Reserve runs family events on weekends and during school holidays and one of the groups it has formed and supported through to independence – the Hornbeam JoyRiders Women’s Cycle Club – have been awarded Club of the Year by London Sports.

READ MORE FROM JIM – ‘So Long and Thanks for all the Dust’ – read the article here.

So Long and Thanks for All the Dust page 1
So Long and Thanks for All the Dust page 1